A Fine Neoclassical Style Gilt-Bronze Hanging Clock and Barometer, with Wedgwood style Jasperware plaques

After PIERRE GOUTHIÈRE (1732-1813)

A Fine Neoclassical Style Gilt-Bronze Hanging Clock and Barometer, with Wedgwood style Jasperware plaques

c. 1880 France

Offered by Adrian Alan

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A Fine Neo-classical Style Gilt-Bronze Hanging Clock and Barometer with Wedgwood Style Jasperware Plaques, after a model by Pierre Gouthière.

The clock and barometer are each surmounted by accompanying thermometers, jasperware plaques and ribbon tied finials. The exceptional gilt-bronze cases are embellished with garlands of roses, ears of grain, cornucopia, fruiting vines and oak leaves in reference to the four seasons. Flanking the upper Jasperware plaque two heads with delicate wings personify the wind.

The set is based on a clock and matching barometer attributed to Pierre-Joseph-Désiré Gouthière (1732-1813), formerly at the Chateau de Saint-Cloud and now residing in the permanent collection of the Musée du Louvre (cat. no's 392 and 393).

The clock has a white enamelled dial with the hours marked in Roman Numerals and the seconds in divisions of five in Arabic numerals. It has a French eight-day duration spring powered movement striking the half hours and the full hours on a single bell. The suspension is a normal bimetallic spring with an adjustable brass pendulum driving an anchor escapement. The movement stamped with the number '80'. The thermometer surmounting the clock consists of a mercury filled glass thermometer capillary tube with the scale running from 25 degrees below zero to 35 degrees above, following the Réaumur scale which was in use at the time of Louis XIV.

The aneroid barometer has a conforming white enamel dial and shows an indication of barometric change moving through the range TEMPETE, Gx Pluie, Pluie Ou VARIABLE, Beau Temps, Beau Fixe, TRES SEC, (Stormy, Rainy Variable, Nice Weather, Fair Weather and Very Dry). The thermometer set above the barometer, consists of an alcohol filled glass thermometer capillary tube with a scale running from 25 degrees below zero to 35 degrees above, following the Réaumur scale.

The unusually cold temperatures attainted in Paris during the winter of 1785 are indicated on the two thermometers and explains the extremes of the scale used.

Pierre Gouthière (1732 - 1813) son of a saddle maker, Pierre Gouthière rose to become the most famous Parisian bronze chaser and gilder of the late 1700s, receiving commissions from some of the leading connoisseurs of his day. Like many successful apprentices, he married the widow of his first employer and took over his establishment. Success came quickly, and in November 1767 he received the title of doreur du roi (Gilder to the King) from Louis XV. Gouthière also supplied works to the Comte d'Artois, the Marquis de Marigny, and the marchand-mercier Dominique Daguerre, among others.

Gouthière was a master of chasing and invented a new type of gilding that left a matte finish. He combined polished with matte finishes to create varied effects on the surfaces of his bronzes. He made many types of objects, including furniture mounts, ornaments for mantelpieces and coaches, and mounts for porcelain or marble vases.
C. Dreyfus, Musée du Louvre, pl. LV, no. 393, for the illustration of an 18th century example attributed to Gouthière
Alcouffe, D, 'Gilt Bronzes in the Louvre', p. 213
Dimensions
Height 116.00 cm (45.67 inches)
Width 23.00 cm (9.06 inches)
Depth 10.00 cm (3.94 inches)
Stock Code
B65420
Medium
Gilt-Bronze
Adrian Alan

Adrian Alan
66/67 South Audley Street
London
W1K 2QX
England

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