A George III Painted Lead model of a Dog Attributed to John Cheere
A George III Painted Lead model of a Dog Attributed to John Cheere
A George III Painted Lead model of a Dog Attributed to John Cheere
A George III Painted Lead model of a Dog Attributed to John Cheere

A George III Painted Lead model of a Dog Attributed to John Cheere

c. 1760 England

Offered by Jamb

£95,000 gbp
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Probably Hogarth's dog Trump, depicted seated, naturalistically painted and on a rectangular stone plinth.
It is said that of the three dogs Hogarth owned, Trump was his favourite: 'It had been
jocularly observed by him (Hogarth) that there was a close resemblance betwixt his own
countenance and that of his favourite dog, who was his faithful friend and companion for
many years and for whom he conceived a greater share of attachment than is normally
bestowed on these domestic animals' (Samuel Ireland, 1 7 99).
Trump was immortalised by Louis François Roubiliac, a member of the circle of artists at St. Martin's Lane Academy and Old Slaughter's Coffee House with whom Hogarth was
connected, in a now lost terracotta model that was listed in the effects of Hogarth's widow in 1 7 89. This model and the well-known bust of Hogarth can be identified by the first plate found in Samuel Ireland's, Graphic Illustrations of Hogarth, published May 1 , 1 7 99. Trump is also generally accepted to be the dog in one of Hogarth's best known works, The Painter and his Pug, 1 7 45 (Tate Gallery ). Roubiliac's terracotta model is thought to be the inspiration for the five known porcelain versions of Trump, modelled by the Chelsea factory.

John and Henry Cheere are known to have worked at West Wycombe Park between 1751 –
1778, with significant payments recorded in 1751 (£118), 1776 (£104) and 1776 (£97). John Cheere specialized in producing lead busts for the decoration of libraries and stairwell. In 1739 he acquired a workshop at Hyde Park Corner that is believed to have had associations with the van Nost family of sculptors. He completed a gilt equestrian statue of William III for St James’ Square, London in 1739 and in 1751 produced a marble statue of George II for the market place, St Helier Jersey. The Portuguese minister in London purchased 98 lead statuses from him for the Royal palace of Queluz, near Lisbon in 1756. David Garrick, the actor, commissioned a life-size lead figure of William Shakespeare for Strartford-upon-Avon and in 1774, Cheere supplied Wedgewood with plaster busts of Shakespeare, Plato, Aristotle and Homer reproduction in Black basalt.
Excellent
Sir Francis Dashwood 2nd Bt., 11th Baron Le Despencer (1708 – 1781), West Wycombe Park,
Buckinghamshire.
Thence by descent at West Wycombe to Sir Francis Dashwood 2nd Bt., sold Sotherby’s
London, 7 April 1987, lot 174
Inventory of Sir Francis Dashwood effects at West Wycombe Park, 1 January 1782, Room
number 16, Gallery “a lead figure of a dog”
Heirloom Inventory, 19 July 1862, “A marble cast of a … bull mastiff sejant (lead cast)
Dimensions
Height 600.00 mm (23.62 inches)
Width 420.00 mm (16.54 inches)
Depth 320.00 mm (12.60 inches)
Stock Code
NB003
Medium
Lead
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