A Near Pair Of Large Aubusson Tapestry Panels Depicting Fêtes Galantes
A Near Pair Of Large Aubusson Tapestry Panels Depicting Fêtes Galantes
A Near Pair Of Large Aubusson Tapestry Panels Depicting Fêtes Galantes
A Near Pair Of Large Aubusson Tapestry Panels Depicting Fêtes Galantes

AUBUSSON (founded c.1580)

A Near Pair Of Large Aubusson Tapestry Panels Depicting Fêtes Galantes

c. 1880 France

Offered by Adrian Alan

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A Near Pair Of Large Aubusson Tapestry Panels Depicting Fêtes Galantes, After Jean-Antoine Watteau and Jean-Honoré Fragonard.

These tapestries depict fêtes galantes, including a game of ‘blind man’s bluff’ and a group of dancing figures, each in a parcel-gilt wood frame. These scenes take after the masters of Rococo painting: Jean-Antoine Watteau, and Jean-Honoré Fragonard with pastoral landscapes after his teacher Francois Boucher.

‘Blind Man’s Bluff’ by Jean-Honoré Fragonard, now in the Toledo Museum of Art, USA, is an emblematic piece that “fulfils the eighteenth-century aristocratic French taste for romantic pastoral themes” (Bacigalupi, Don. Toledo Museum of Art Masterworks. Toledo Museum of Art: USA, 2009. p. 205). This painting dates to circa 1760 – when the artist embarked on a Grand Tour of Italy, executing numerous sketches of local scenery that would go on to become the delicate and romantic gardens of his art.

Jean-Honoré Fragonard (1732-1806), French painter of the rococo age, was popular in the courts of Louis XV and Louis XVI for his delicately coloured scenes of romance, often in garden settings. Born in Grasse on April 5 1732, the son of a haberdasher's assistant his family moved to Paris around 1738, and in 1747 he was apprenticed to a lawyer, who noticed his talent for drawing and suggested that he study painting. François Boucher (1703-1770) accepted him as a pupil (c. 1748), and in 1752, he competed for the Prix de Rome to study under the court painter to Louis XV, Carle Van Loo and in 1756, he went to the French Academy at Rome. After returning to Paris, Fragonard exhibited some landscape paintings at the Salon, one of which was purchased for King Louis XV. Subsequently, he was commissioned to paint a companion piece, granted a studio in the Louvre Palace, and accepted as an Academician.

Jean-Antoine Watteau is credited with inventing the genre of the fête galante – and his painting ‘Le Bal Champetre’ from circa 1714, perfectly encapsulates this genre. Depicting dancing figures accompanied by musicians and other guests, this painting is a fine example of the artist’s engagement in movement, idyllic charm, and theatricality.

Jean-Antoine Watteau (1684-1721) was a French painting whose brief career had an immense impact in shifting the Baroque style to the more light-hearted, naturalistic Rococo style. Watteau was born in Valenciennes, the son of a roofer, and showed an interest in painting from an early age. He may have been apprenticed to local artist Jacques-Albert Gérin before moving to Paris in 1702, where he began by making copies of popular genre paintings in a workshop at Pont Notre-Dame. By 1705 he was an assistant to the painted Claude Gillot, and in 1712 he applied for the Prix de Rome after being rejected in 1709, and he was accepted as a full member of the Academy.
In Very Good Original Unrestored Condition
Dimensions
Height 285.00 cm (112.20 inches)
Width 180.00 cm (70.87 inches)
Stock Code
B73883
Medium
Tapestry, giltwood
Adrian Alan

Adrian Alan
66/67 South Audley Street
London
W1K 2QX
England

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