Antique Black Lacquered Papier Maché Teapoy c.1880
Antique Black Lacquered Papier Maché Teapoy c.1880
Antique Black Lacquered Papier Maché Teapoy c.1880
Antique Black Lacquered Papier Maché Teapoy c.1880
Antique Black Lacquered Papier Maché Teapoy c.1880
Antique Black Lacquered Papier Maché Teapoy c.1880
Antique Black Lacquered Papier Maché Teapoy c.1880
Antique Black Lacquered Papier Maché Teapoy c.1880
Antique Black Lacquered Papier Maché Teapoy c.1880
Antique Black Lacquered Papier Maché Teapoy c.1880

Antique Black Lacquered Papier Maché Teapoy c.1880

c. 1880 England

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This is an antique Victorian black lacquered Papier Maché, teapoy, circa 1880 in date. It has gilded decoration and the hinged cover has hand painted floral decoration.

The beautiful interior comprises a pair of cylindrical lidded zinc lined compartments for tea and a cut glass mixing bowl.

The center pillar of the table stands on triple scroll supports.

It is a lovely decorative piece which is sure to attract a lot of interest from your guests.


Condition:

In excellent original and untouched condition, please see photos for confirmation of condition.


Dimensions in cm:

Height 77 x Width 46 x Depth 40

Dimensions in inches:

Height 30.3 x Width 18.1 x Depth 15.7
Papier Maché, French for "chewed paper”, is a composite material consisting of paper pieces or pulp, sometimes reinforced with textiles, bound with an adhesive, such as glue, starch, or wallpaper paste.
The traditional method of making papier-m ché adhesive is to use a mixture of water and flour or other starch, mixed to the consistency of heavy cream.
Starting around 1725 in Europe, gilded papier-m ché began to appear as a low-cost alternative to similarly treated plaster or carved wood in architecture. Henry Clay of Birmingham, England, patented a process for treating laminated sheets of paper with linseed oil to produce waterproof panels in 1772. These sheets were used for building coach door panels, amongst other structural uses. Theodore Jennens patented a process in 1847 for steaming and pressing these laminated sheets into various shapes, which were then used to manufacture trays, chair backs, and structural panels, usually laid over a wood or metal armature for strength. The papier-m ché was smoothed and lacquered, or finished with a pearl shell finish. The industry lasted through the 19th century.Russia had a thriving industry in ornamental papier-m ché. A large assortment of painted Russian papier-m ché items appear in a Tiffany & Co. catalog from 1893.Martin Travers the English ecclesiastical designer made much use of papier mache for his church furnishings in the 1930s.



Victorian Furniture (1830 - 1901)
very popular today, probably due to its accessibility more than the esthethics. There was plenty of furniture made due to the change in history of methods of manufacture, the machine had taken over and was able to produce mass amounts of Victorian furniture to satisfy the vast demand by the middle class people that desired it.

Furniture history changed forever through the Victorian period. It became desirable to have a home laden with furniture to show your status to your peers.

Throughout history Queen Victoria identified herself with the middle class. Therefore the furniture of this period was made for an ever-increasing middle class population. The most popular woods used to produce furniture included: mahogany, burr walnut, rosewood and ebony. Thick, darkly coloured woods with ornate carvings, high-tone gloss, richly carved silhouettes and as many flourishes and ornaments as the surface of a piece of furniture would allow were typical for this period. They were designed to give the appearance of being owned by the wealthy.

Mahogany and rosewood were popular and rich colours, intensified by layering high-gloss lacquers over stained wood were highly desired. Comfort was an important consideration for purchasers who wanted their homes to be gracious reflections of their financial, so velvet cushions and brocade sofa fabric were often coordinated with velvet drapes for maximum impact.



Teapoy

is a type of small pedestal table equipped with a box attached to a tripod base. Usually the box was a tea caddy, used for storing loose tea; if it was flat-topped, the teapoy could also serve as a small tea table. Despite the teapoy's function, however, the name actually derives not from the word "tea" but from a Hindi/Persian phrase meaning "three-footed." Teapoys developed in mid-18th-century England, and many were actually made in British colonial India.

Teapoys continued to be popular into the mid-19th century, growing increasingly ornate. Over time, the term also came to mean any stand with box attached - even if it stood on four legs.
Stock Code
05410
Regent Antiques

Regent Antiques
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318 Green Lanes
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N4 1BX

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