Antique Ebonised Gilt Bronze Chiming Mantel Clock c1860
Antique Ebonised Gilt Bronze Chiming Mantel Clock c1860
Antique Ebonised Gilt Bronze Chiming Mantel Clock c1860
Antique Ebonised Gilt Bronze Chiming Mantel Clock c1860
Antique Ebonised Gilt Bronze Chiming Mantel Clock c1860
Antique Ebonised Gilt Bronze Chiming Mantel Clock c1860
Antique Ebonised Gilt Bronze Chiming Mantel Clock c1860
Antique Ebonised Gilt Bronze Chiming Mantel Clock c1860
Antique Ebonised Gilt Bronze Chiming Mantel Clock c1860
Antique Ebonised Gilt Bronze Chiming Mantel Clock c1860

Antique Ebonised Gilt Bronze Chiming Mantel Clock c1860

c. 1860 England

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This is an antique ormolu mounted and ebonised chiming mantel clock, circa 1860 in date . The dial is signed John Gaydon, Barnstaple.

The clock has a rectangular case with pineapple urn finials, the arched pediment with a floral mount and turned boss top surmounted by a pineapple urn.

The arched door with scrolling mounts, the canted sides with caratyd mounts, the sides with decorative drop handles above ormolu pierced panels .

The arched brass dial with foliate mounts and corners. There is a 7" signed silvered Roman chapter ring with outer five minute Arabic divisions and sanded centred, the arch with three silvered subsidiary dials. These dials are marked, chime / silent, slow/fast and chime Westminster on 8 bells.

The brass four pillar with triple barrel movement chiming musically on eight bells and striking on a gong.

The clock comes complete with original pendulum, bells, gong and a key.

It keeps really good time and is delightful to look at.

Condition:

In excellent condition, please see photos for confirmation.


Dimensions in cm:

Height 66 x Width 37 x Depth 25

Dimensions in inches:

Height 2 feet, 2 inches x Width 1 foot, 3 inches x Depth 10 inches
John Gaydon (1821 - 1895) is recorded as working at 99 High Street, Barnstaple from circa 1855 until his death in 1895, as both a clockmaker and jeweller.

The Gaydon family were well-known as jewellers and watchmakers in both North Devon and London. Some twenty-six of them are recorded as watch and clockmakers, and were Watchmakers to the Queen (Victoria) and Watchmakers to the Admiralty, with one, Henry Martin Gaydon of Middlesex, becoming Master of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers in 1925.

John Gaydon supplied a clock for the town's police station in 1855 as well as another for the Globe Hotel, which had double dials, one showing in the bar and the other in the smoking room.

Gaydon's Barnstaple business supplied various church and public clocks in Devon, with that at Swimbridge church having an inscription dated 1880 in commemoration of the restoration of the church, with a note that the clock was supplied and given by the Gaydon brothers, including John Gaydon of Barnstaple and three other brothers now resident at Brentford, but all having been 'natives of Swimbridge'.


Ormolu - (from French 'or moulu', signifying ground or pounded gold) is an 18th-century English term for applying finely ground, high-carat gold in a mercury amalgam to an object of bronze.The mercury is driven off in a kiln leaving behind a gold-coloured veneer known as 'gilt bronze'.

The manufacture of true ormolu employs a process known as mercury-gilding or fire-gilding, in which a solution of nitrate of mercury is applied to a piece of copper, brass, or bronze, followed by the application of an amalgam of gold and mercury. The item was then exposed to extreme heat until the mercury burned off and the gold remained, adhered to the metal object.

No true ormolu was produced in France after around 1830 because legislation had outlawed the use of mercury. Therefore, other techniques were used instead but nothing surpasses the original mercury-firing ormolu method for sheer beauty and richness of colour. Electroplating is the most common modern technique. Ormolu techniques are essentially the same as those used on silver, to produce silver-gilt (also known as vermeil).

The Westminster Quarters is the most common name for a melody used by a set of clock bells to chime on each quarter hour. The number of chime sets matches the number of quarter hours that have passed. It is also known as the Westminster Chimes, or the Cambridge Chimes from its place of origin, the church of St Mary the Great, Cambridge.

This chime is traditionally, though without substantiation, believed to be a set of variations on the four notes that make up the fifth and sixth measures of "I know that my Redeemer liveth" from Handel's Messiah. This is why the chime is also played by the bells of the so-called 'Red Tower' in Halle, the native town of Handel.

It was written in 1793 for a new clock in St Mary the Great, the University Church in Cambridge. There is some doubt over exactly who composed it: Revd Dr Joseph Jowett,Regius Professor of Civil Law, was given the job, but he was probably assisted by either Dr John Randall (1715–99), who was the Professor of Music from 1755, or his brilliant undergraduate pupil, William Crotch (1775-1847).

In the mid-19th century the chime was adopted by the clock tower at the Palace of Westminster (where Big Ben hangs), whence its fame spread. It is now possibly the most commonly used chime for striking clocks. According to the church records of Trinity Episcopal Church (Williamsport, Pennsylvania), this chime sequence was incorporated into a tower clock mechanism by the E. Howard & Co., Boston, MA. The clock and chime in Trinity's steeple base was dedicated in December 1875. It holds the distinction of being the first tower clock in the United States to sound the Cambridge Quarters.


Our reference: 06216
Stock Code
06216
Regent Antiques

Regent Antiques
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N4 1BX

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