Antique Edwardian Rosewood Inlaid Cabinet c. 1890
Antique Edwardian Rosewood Inlaid Cabinet c. 1890
Antique Edwardian Rosewood Inlaid Cabinet c. 1890
Antique Edwardian Rosewood Inlaid Cabinet c. 1890
Antique Edwardian Rosewood Inlaid Cabinet c. 1890
Antique Edwardian Rosewood Inlaid Cabinet c. 1890
Antique Edwardian Rosewood Inlaid Cabinet c. 1890
Antique Edwardian Rosewood Inlaid Cabinet c. 1890
Antique Edwardian Rosewood Inlaid Cabinet c. 1890
Antique Edwardian Rosewood Inlaid Cabinet c. 1890

Antique Edwardian Rosewood Inlaid Cabinet c. 1890

c. 1890 England

Offered by Regent Antiques

£2,350 gbp
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This is a stunning antique English Edwardian inlaid rosewood cabinet with mirror panels, circa 1890 in date.

This cabinet is of the very highest quality, with exquisite hand cut inlaid satinwood marquetry decoration.

The top has an elegant arch pediment centred by an urn finial and a cupboard with a pair of glazed doors.

It has an interesting arrangement of open shelves, mirror panels and inlaid Marquetry panels.


The lower part also has a pair of glazed doors and four single panel doors. It is raised raised on decorative turned feet, has it's original handles and working locks and keys.

The quality and attention to detail throughout is second to none, add a touch of unparalleled style to your home.

Condition:

In excellent condition having been beautifully restored in our workshops, please see photos for confirmation.


Dimensions in cm:

Height 216 x Width 136 x Depth 42

Dimensions in inches:

Height 7 feet, 1 inch x Width 4 feet, 5 inches x Depth 1 foot, 4 inches
Rosewood is a rich warm reddish brown wood that has a distinct grain with dark brown and black outlining. One variety of Rosewood can vary significantly from another even though it is of the same species. These Rosewoods, native of India, South East Asia and Brazil, were dense and awkward to work with. It was renowned for quickly bluntening cutting tools and visibly darkening in colour when over prepared.

The Brazilian species of Rosewood was by far the most beautifully figured and therefore it became the most sought after and rare. This was the wood of choice for the great box makers, David and Thomas Edwards who used it to veneer some of their finest pieces.


Marquetry is decorative artistry where pieces of material (such as wood, mother of pearl, pewter, brass silver or shell) of different colours are inserted into surface wood veneer to form intricate patterns such as scrolls or flowers.

The technique of veneered marquetry had its inspiration in 16th century Florence. Marquetry elaborated upon Florentine techniques of inlaying solid marble slabs with designs formed of fitted marbles, jaspers and semi-precious stones. This work, called opere di commessi, has medieval parallels in Central Italian "Cosmati"-work of inlaid marble floors, altars and columns. The technique is known in English as pietra dura, for the "hardstones" used: onyx, jasper, cornelian, lapis lazuli and colored marbles. In Florence, the Chapel of the Medici at San Lorenzo is completely covered in a colored marble facing using this demanding jig-sawn technique.

Techniques of wood marquetry were developed in Antwerp and other Flemish centers of luxury cabinet-making during the early 16th century. The craft was imported full-blown to France after the mid-seventeenth century, to create furniture of unprecedented luxury being made at the royal manufactory of the Gobelins, charged with providing furnishings to decorate Versailles and the other royal residences of Louis XIV. Early masters of French marquetry were the Fleming Pierre Golle and his son-in-law, André-Charles Boulle, who founded a dynasty of royal and Parisian cabinet-makers (ébénistes) and gave his name to a technique of marquetry employing brass with pewter in arabesque or intricately foliate designs.

Satinwood
is a hard and durable wood with a satinlike sheen, much used in cabinetmaking, especially in marquetry. It comes from two tropical trees of the family Rutaceae (rue family). East Indian or Ceylon satinwood is the yellowish or dark-brown heartwood of Chloroxylon swietenia.

The lustrous, fine-grained, usually figured wood is used for furniture, cabinetwork, veneers, and backs of brushes. West Indian satinwood, sometimes called yellow wood, is considered superior. It is the golden yellow, lustrous, even-grained wood found in the Florida Keys and the West Indies.

It has long been valued for furniture. It is also used for musical instruments, veneers, and other purposes. Satinwood is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Sapindales, family Rutaceae.



Our reference: 06841
Stock Code
06841
Regent Antiques

Regent Antiques
Manor Warehouse
318 Green Lanes
London
N4 1BX

+44 (0)20 8802 3900
+44 (0)7836 294074
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