Antique Flame Mahogany & Inlaid Cylinder Bureau Desk Shoolbred 19th C
Antique Flame Mahogany & Inlaid Cylinder Bureau Desk Shoolbred 19th C
Antique Flame Mahogany & Inlaid Cylinder Bureau Desk Shoolbred 19th C
Antique Flame Mahogany & Inlaid Cylinder Bureau Desk Shoolbred 19th C
Antique Flame Mahogany & Inlaid Cylinder Bureau Desk Shoolbred 19th C
Antique Flame Mahogany & Inlaid Cylinder Bureau Desk Shoolbred 19th C

Antique Flame Mahogany & Inlaid Cylinder Bureau Desk Shoolbred 19th C

19th century England

Offered by Regent Antiques

£2,950 gbp
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A superb late Victorian flame mahogany, floral marquetry inlaid and crossbanded, cylinder bureau, circa 1870 in date.

The cylinder inlaid with a large urn with garlands. it opens to reveal a sliding mechanism fitted interior with pigeon holes and six small drawers, a pull out writing surface fitted with an inset gold tooled burgundy leather writing surface, over a further pair of floral marquetry inlaid drawers in the frieze.

The left hand frieze drawer bears the ivorine label of the retailer

JAS. SHOOLBRED & CO. TOTTENHAM CT. ROAD, LONDON.

Fitted with the original elegant brass handles and raised on square, tapered legs that terminate in brass capped toes and castors.

With working locks and keys.

Condition:
In excellent condition having been beautifully cleaned, repolished and the leather relined in our workshops, please see photos for confirmation.

Dimensions in cm:
Height 116 x Width 101 x Depth 63

Dimensions in inches:
Height 45.7 x Width 39.8 x Depth 24.8

James Shoolbred
started his company in Tottenham Court Road by purchasing number 155 in the 1820s. He was involved in supplying textiles to the burgeoning interior decoration market in London. He must have done well and quickly because he soon purchased numbers 154 and 156, either side of the original building. With his newly expanded premises, the shop was restructured and the stock was expanded. The new premises included a haberdashers and a carpet warehouse, as well as expanded accommodation for the stock of textiles, which included wool, silk and linen.

By the 1880s the company had expanded to such an extent that the business had to move again, this time into premises that functioned as an early department store. The new store was popular from the start. One aspect that proved popular with customers was the detailed displays of interior decorative schemes. Furniture, textiles, carpets and various accessories would be laid out as they would be seen in a real interior. This made it much easier for customers to perceive what their purchases would look like outside the constraints of the department store. It was also a good retail trick as it encouraged customers to buy whole ensembles, which they could reconstruct in their own home without having to hire an interior designer or sort out interior schemes themselves. This marketing trick is still used extensively today by such retail giants as Ikea.

By the 1870s, the company had started to design and manufacture their own furniture. This furniture, along with other interior accessories, were displayed in a series of catalogues that started to appear from about 1873 onwards. The catalogues were meant to expand the appeal of James Shoolbred & Co beyond their department store, and more importantly, beyond London.

Furniture design became an increasingly important aspect of the company and therefore played a large part in the catalogues that the company produced every year. All the major fashionable Revival movements were included, ranging from Gothic to Japanese, and included the numerous French styles.

Interestingly, because James Shoolbred & Co produced catalogues that were so detailed and wide ranging, many were used as literal pattern books in order to copy the latest London styles. This was a particular problem in far-flung British outposts like Australia and New Zealand where there was a brisk trade in James Shoolbred & Co furniture design, with details being worked out from the illustrations generously provided by the company. This furniture was then passed off as being part of a locally designed production.

The catalogues today are an intriguing view of interior tastes and styles of the later nineteenth century and are an invaluable tool, as are all catalogues, for any researcher, historian or anyone with an interest in the history of domestic interior design and decoration.
Despite James Shoolbred & Co’s popularity and market presence, the company struggled after the market crash of 1929 and closed for good in 1931.

Flame Mahogany
Thomas Sheraton - 18th century furniture designer, once characterized mahogany as "best suited to furniture where strength is demanded as well as a wood that works up easily, has a beautiful figure and polishes so well that it is an ornament to any room in which it may be placed." Matching his words to his work, Sheraton designed much mahogany furniture. The qualities that impressed Sheraton are particularly evident in a distinctive pattern of wood called "flame mahogany."

The flame figure in the wood is revealed by slicing through the face of the branch at the point where it joins another element of the tree.

Our reference: 08863
Dimensions
Height 116.00 cm (45.67 inches)
Width 101.00 cm (39.76 inches)
Depth 63.00 cm (24.80 inches)
Stock Code
08863
Regent Antiques

Regent Antiques
Manor Warehouse
318 Green Lanes
London
N4 1BX

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