Antique French Marquetry Commode Sideboard Marble Top
Antique French Marquetry Commode Sideboard Marble Top
Antique French Marquetry Commode Sideboard Marble Top
Antique French Marquetry Commode Sideboard Marble Top
Antique French Marquetry Commode Sideboard Marble Top
Antique French Marquetry Commode Sideboard Marble Top
Antique French Marquetry Commode Sideboard Marble Top
Antique French Marquetry Commode Sideboard Marble Top
Antique French Marquetry Commode Sideboard Marble Top
Antique French Marquetry Commode Sideboard Marble Top

Antique French Marquetry Commode Sideboard Marble Top

c. 1900 France

Offered by Regent Antiques

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This stunning Antique French commode is in the French Louis XV/XVI transitional style and dates from the early 20th Century.

It was crafted from the most beautiful kingwood, has the most wonderful ormolu mounts with exquisite floral marquetry and parquetry decoration. It is surmounted with a beautiful peach variegated marble top that has an elegant moulded edge.

The frieze with fabulous ormolu decoration is fitted with a long central drawer with a smaller drawer on each side. It has three spacious cupboards below, each with a central shelf. The central panel with a marquetry of flowers and foliage in a basket, flanked by panels with lattice parquetry with similar panels to the sides.

The alluring contrast between the Kingwood and the peach marble is offset by the most amazing gilded bronze handles and mounts.

An exquisite marble top serves as the proverbial cherry to this masterpiece, accentuating the majestic aura surrounding this magnificent item.

With working locks and keys.

This delicious piece of craftsmanship could serve any purpose. A truly gorgeous piece, this commode deserves pride of place in any furniture collection.


In excellent condition, please see photos for confirmation.

Dimensions in cm:

Height 87 x Width 140 x Depth 53

Dimensions in inches:

Height 34.3 x Width 55.1 x Depth 20.9
is a classic furniture wood, almost exclusively used for inlays on very fine furniture. Occasionally it is used in the solid for small items and turned work, including parts of billiard cues, e.g., those made by John Parris. It is brownish-purple with many fine darker stripes and occasional irregular swirls. Occasionally it contains pale streaks of a similar colour to sapwood.

The wood is very dense and hard and can be brought to a spectacular finish. it turns well but due to its density and hardness can be difficult to work with hand tools. It also has a tendency to blunt the tools due to its abrasive properties.

is decorative artistry where pieces of material (such as wood, mother of pearl, pewter, brass silver or shell) of different colours are inserted into surface wood veneer to form intricate patterns such as scrolls or flowers.

The technique of veneered marquetry had its inspiration in 16th century Florence. Marquetry elaborated upon Florentine techniques of inlaying solid marble slabs with designs formed of fitted marbles, jaspers and semi-precious stones. This work, called opere di commessi, has medieval parallels in Central Italian "Cosmati"-work of inlaid marble floors, altars and columns. The technique is known in English as pietra dura, for the "hardstones" used: onyx, jasper, cornelian, lapis lazuli and colored marbles. In Florence, the Chapel of the Medici at San Lorenzo is completely covered in a colored marble facing using this demanding jig-sawn technique.

Techniques of wood marquetry were developed in Antwerp and other Flemish centers of luxury cabinet-making during the early 16th century. The craft was imported full-blown to France after the mid-seventeenth century, to create furniture of unprecedented luxury being made at the royal manufactory of the Gobelins, charged with providing furnishings to decorate Versailles and the other royal residences of Louis XIV. Early masters of French marquetry were the Fleming Pierre Golle and his son-in-law, André-Charles Boulle, who founded a dynasty of royal and Parisian cabinet-makers (ébénistes) and gave his name to a technique of marquetry employing tortoiseshell and brass with pewter in arabesque or intricately foliate designs.

Parquetry - is a geometric mosaic of wood pieces used for decorative effect. The two main uses of parquetry are as veneer patterns on furniture and block patterns for flooring. Parquet patterns are entirely geometrical and angular—squares, triangles, lozenges.
The word derives from the Old French parchet (the diminutive of parc), literally meaning "a small enclosed space". Large diagonal squares known as parquet de Versailles were introduced in 1684 as parquet de menuiserie ("woodwork parquet") to replace the marble flooring that required constant washing, which tended to rot the joists beneath the floors. Such parquets en lozange were noted by the Swedish architect Daniel Cronström at Versailles and at the Grand Trianon in 1693.

Timber contrasting in color and grain, such as oak, walnut, cherry, lime, pine, maple etc. are sometimes employed; and in the more expensive kinds the richly coloured mahogany and sometimes other tropical hardwoods are also used.

Ormolu (from French 'or moulu', signifying ground or pounded gold) is an 18th-century English term for applying finely ground, high-carat gold in a mercury amalgam to an object of bronze.The mercury is driven off in a kiln leaving behind a gold-coloured veneer known as 'gilt bronze'.
The manufacture of true ormolu employs a process known as mercury-gilding or fire-gilding, in which a solution of nitrate of mercury is applied to a piece of copper, brass, or bronze, followed by the application of an amalgam of gold and mercury. The item was then exposed to extreme heat until the mercury burned off and the gold remained, adhered to the metal object.

No true ormolu was produced in France after around 1830 because legislation had outlawed the use of mercury. Therefore, other techniques were used instead but nothing surpasses the original mercury-firing ormolu method for sheer beauty and richness of colour. Electroplating is the most common modern technique. Ormolu techniques are essentially the same as those used on silver, to produce silver-gilt (also known as vermeil).

Our reference: 05830
Stock Code
Regent Antiques

Regent Antiques
Manor Warehouse
318 Green Lanes
N4 1BX

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