Antique Pair Victorian Mahogany Armchairs c.1860
Antique Pair Victorian Mahogany Armchairs c.1860
Antique Pair Victorian Mahogany Armchairs c.1860
Antique Pair Victorian Mahogany Armchairs c.1860
Antique Pair Victorian Mahogany Armchairs c.1860
Antique Pair Victorian Mahogany Armchairs c.1860
Antique Pair Victorian Mahogany Armchairs c.1860
Antique Pair Victorian Mahogany Armchairs c.1860
Antique Pair Victorian Mahogany Armchairs c.1860
Antique Pair Victorian Mahogany Armchairs c.1860

Antique Pair Victorian Mahogany Armchairs c.1860

c. 1860 England

Offered by Regent Antiques

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This is a comfortable pair of Victorian mahogany framed spoonback arm chairs, upholstered in "champignon" velvet and buttoned, on cabriole front legs.

They were beautifully hand carved from solid mahogany, the front legs terminate in the original porcelain and brass castors, and the upholstery is in good condition.

There is no mistaking their unique quality and design, which is certain to make them a talking point in your home.

Condition:

Very good and have been well cared for, please see photographs to confirm.


Dimensions in cm:

Height 103.5 x Width 72 x Depth 77

Dimensions in inches:

Height 40.7 x Width 28.3 x Depth 30.3
Victorian Furniture
(1830 - 1901) very popular today, probably due to its accessibility more than the esthethics. There was plenty of furniture made due to the change in history of methods of manufacture, the machine had taken over and was able to produce mass amounts of Victorian furniture to satisfy the vast demand by the middle class people that desired it.

Furniture history changed forever through the Victorian period. It became desirable to have a home laden with furniture to show your status to your peers.

Throughout history Queen Victoria identified herself with the middle class. Therefore the furniture of this period was made for an ever-increasing middle class population. The most popular woods used to produce furniture included: mahogany, burr walnut, rosewood and ebony. Thick, darkly coloured woods with ornate carvings, high-tone gloss, richly carved silhouettes and as many flourishes and ornaments as the surface of a piece of furniture would allow were typical for this period. They were designed to give the appearance of being owned by the wealthy.

Mahogany and rosewood were popular and rich colours, intensified by layering high-gloss lacquers over stained wood were highly desired. Comfort was an important consideration for purchasers who wanted their homes to be gracious reflections of their financial, so velvet cushions and brocade sofa fabric were often coordinated with velvet drapes for maximum impact.

Mahogany
is probably one of the largest ‘families’ of hardwood, having many different varieties within its own species.
Mahogany has been used for centuries in ship building, house building, furniture making etc and is the core structure of just about every 19th century vanity box, dressing case or jewellery box. It became more of a Victorian trend to dress Mahogany with these decorative veneers, such as Rosewood, Kingwood, Burr Walnut and Coromandel, so that the actual Mahogany was almost hidden from view.

Mahogany itself is a rich reddish brown wood that can range from being plain in appearance to something that is so vibrant, figured and almost three dimensional in effect.

Although Mahogany was most often used in its solid form, it also provided some beautifully figured varieties of veneer like ‘Flame’ Mahogany and ‘Fiddleback’ Mahogany (named after its preferred use in the manufacture of fine musical instruments).

Cuban Mahogany was so sought after, that by the late 1850′s, this particular variety became all but extinct.
Stock Code
05430
Regent Antiques

Regent Antiques
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