Antique Syrian Inlaid Revolving Bookcase c.1880
Antique Syrian Inlaid Revolving Bookcase c.1880
Antique Syrian Inlaid Revolving Bookcase c.1880
Antique Syrian Inlaid Revolving Bookcase c.1880
Antique Syrian Inlaid Revolving Bookcase c.1880
Antique Syrian Inlaid Revolving Bookcase c.1880
Antique Syrian Inlaid Revolving Bookcase c.1880
Antique Syrian Inlaid Revolving Bookcase c.1880
Antique Syrian Inlaid Revolving Bookcase c.1880
Antique Syrian Inlaid Revolving Bookcase c.1880

Antique Syrian Inlaid Revolving Bookcase c.1880

c. 1880 Syria

Offered by Regent Antiques

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This is a fabulous antique Syrian parquetry revolving bookcase C 1880 in date.

The exquisite inlaid marquetry and parquetry decoration is of walnut, ebony and different kinds of fruitwood all of which is complimented with beautiful mother of pearl.

This clever bookcase revolves so you can select your book, video or cd, without leaving your armchair.


Condition:

In really excellent condition, please see photos for confirmation.


Dimensions in cm:

Height 75 x Width 50 x Depth 50

Dimensions in inches:

Height 29.5 x Width 19.7 x Depth 19.7
Nacre
also known as mother of pearl, is an organic-inorganic composite material produced by some molluscs as an inner shell layer; it is also what makes up the outer coating of pearls. It is strong, resilient, and iridescent. The outer layer of pearls and the inside layer of pearl oyster and freshwater pearl mussel shells are made of nacre.

Both black and white nacre are and were used for design purposes. They were used as decorative motif used in cabinet making or silversmithing. The natural nacre may be artificially tinted to almost any colour. Nacre tesserae may be cut into shapes and laminated to a ceramic tile or marble base. The tesserae are hand-placed and closely sandwiched together, creating an irregular mosaic or pattern (such as a weave). The laminated material is typically about 2 mm thick. The tesserae are then lacquered and polished creating a durable and glossy surface.


Marquetry
is decorative artistry where pieces of material (such as wood, mother of pearl, pewter, brass silver or shell) of different colours are inserted into surface wood veneer to form intricate patterns such as scrolls or flowers.

The technique of veneered marquetry had its inspiration in 16th century Florence. Marquetry elaborated upon Florentine techniques of inlaying solid marble slabs with designs formed of fitted marbles, jaspers and semi-precious stones. This work, called opere di commessi, has medieval parallels in Central Italian "Cosmati"-work of inlaid marble floors, altars and columns. The technique is known in English as pietra dura, for the "hardstones" used: onyx, jasper, cornelian, lapis lazuli and colored marbles. In Florence, the Chapel of the Medici at San Lorenzo is completely covered in a colored marble facing using this demanding jig-sawn technique.

Techniques of wood marquetry were developed in Antwerp and other Flemish centers of luxury cabinet-making during the early 16th century. The craft was imported full-blown to France after the mid-seventeenth century, to create furniture of unprecedented luxury being made at the royal manufactory of the Gobelins, charged with providing furnishings to decorate Versailles and the other royal residences of Louis XIV. Early masters of French marquetry were the Fleming Pierre Golle and his son-in-law, André-Charles Boulle, who founded a dynasty of royal and Parisian cabinet-makers (ébénistes) and gave his name to a technique of marquetry employing tortoiseshell and brass with pewter in arabesque or intricately foliate designs.

Parquetry -
is a geometric mosaic of wood pieces used for decorative effect. The two main uses of parquetry are as veneer patterns on furniture and block patterns for flooring. Parquet patterns are entirely geometrical and angular—squares, triangles, lozenges.

The word derives from the Old French parchet (the diminutive of parc), literally meaning "a small enclosed space". Large diagonal squares known as parquet de Versailles were introduced in 1684 as parquet de menuiserie ("woodwork parquet") to replace the marble flooring that required constant washing, which tended to rot the joists beneath the floors. Such parquets en lozange were noted by the Swedish architect Daniel Cronström at Versailles and at the Grand Trianon in 1693.


Timber contrasting in color and grain, such as oak, walnut, cherry, lime, pine, maple etc. are sometimes employed; and in the more expensive kinds the richly coloured mahogany and sometimes other tropical hardwoods are also used.




Our reference: 06131
Stock Code
06131
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