Antique Victorian Calamander Inlaid Credenza c.1850
Antique Victorian Calamander Inlaid Credenza c.1850
Antique Victorian Calamander Inlaid Credenza c.1850
Antique Victorian Calamander Inlaid Credenza c.1850
Antique Victorian Calamander Inlaid Credenza c.1850
Antique Victorian Calamander Inlaid Credenza c.1850
Antique Victorian Calamander Inlaid Credenza c.1850
Antique Victorian Calamander Inlaid Credenza c.1850
Antique Victorian Calamander Inlaid Credenza c.1850
Antique Victorian Calamander Inlaid Credenza c.1850
Antique Victorian Calamander Inlaid Credenza c.1850

Antique Victorian Calamander Inlaid Credenza c.1850

c. 1850 England

Offered by Regent Antiques

£6,750 gbp
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This is a superb antique Victorian calamander and burr walnut inlaid credenza, it is circa 1850 in date. Oozing sophistication and charm, this credenza is the absolute epitome of Victorian high society.

The entire piece highlights the unique and truly exceptional pattern of the calamander wood extremely well. It has burr walnut insets with fruitwood inlaid decoration and the most wonderful marquetry decoration with kingwood crossbanding which was the work of a Victorian master craftsman. This credenza has elegant serpentine open ends with a panelled door in the centre which opens to reveal a shelf and plenty of room to house your drinks, glasses, crockery, etc. The serpentine ends are mirror backed and the shelves have intricate ormolu galleries at the front.

It is smothered in fabulous ormolu mounts which give this cabinet the regal look. Its attention to detail and lavish decoration are certain to draw the eye wherever you choose to place it in your home.


Condition:

In really excellent condition having been beautifully restored and the interior relined, with a beautiful golden fabric,in our workshops, please see photos for confirmation.


Dimensions in cm:

Height 107 x Width 206 x Depth 50

Dimensions in inches:

Height 42.1 x Width 81.1 x Depth 19.7
Coromandel wood or Calamander wood is a valuable wood from India, Sri Lanka and South East Asia. It is of a hazel-brown color, with black stripes (or the other way about), very heavy and hard. It is also known as Macassar Ebony or variegated ebony and is closely related to genuine ebony, but is obtained from different species in the same genus; one of these is Diospyros quaesita Thwaites, from Sri Lanka. The name Calamander comes from the local sinhalese name, 'kalu-medhiriya', which means dark chamber; referring to the characteristic ebony black wood.

Coromandel wood has been logged to extinction over the last 2 to 3 hundred years and is no longer available for new work in any quantity. Furniture in coromandel is so expensive and so well looked after that even recycling it is an unlikely source. A substitute, Macassar Ebony, has similar characteristics and to the untrained eye is nearly the same but it lacks the depth of colour seen in genuine Coromandel.



Burr Walnut refers to the swirling figure present in nearly all walnut when cut and polished, and especially in the wood taken from the base of the tree where it joins the roots. However the true burr is a rare growth on the tree where hundreds of tiny branches have started to grow. Burr walnut produces some of the most complex and beautiful figuring you can find.


Ormolu (from French 'or moulu', signifying ground or pounded gold) is an 18th-century English term for applying finely ground, high-carat gold in a mercury amalgam to an object of bronze.The mercury is driven off in a kiln leaving behind a gold-coloured veneer known as 'gilt bronze'.

The manufacture of true ormolu employs a process known as mercury-gilding or fire-gilding, in which a solution of nitrate of mercury is applied to a piece of copper, brass, or bronze, followed by the application of an amalgam of gold and mercury. The item was then exposed to extreme heat until the mercury burned off and the gold remained, adhered to the metal object.

No true ormolu was produced in France after around 1830 because legislation had outlawed the use of mercury. Therefore, other techniques were used instead but nothing surpasses the original mercury-firing ormolu method for sheer beauty and richness of colour. Electroplating is the most common modern technique. Ormolu techniques are essentially the same as those used on silver, to produce silver-gilt (also known as vermeil).
Stock Code
04181
Regent Antiques

Regent Antiques
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318 Green Lanes
London
N4 1BX

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