Antique Victorian French Walnut Chaise Longue c.1860
Antique Victorian French Walnut Chaise Longue c.1860
Antique Victorian French Walnut Chaise Longue c.1860
Antique Victorian French Walnut Chaise Longue c.1860
Antique Victorian French Walnut Chaise Longue c.1860
Antique Victorian French Walnut Chaise Longue c.1860
Antique Victorian French Walnut Chaise Longue c.1860
Antique Victorian French Walnut Chaise Longue c.1860
Antique Victorian French Walnut Chaise Longue c.1860
Antique Victorian French Walnut Chaise Longue c.1860

Antique Victorian French Walnut Chaise Longue c.1860

c. 1860 France

Offered by Regent Antiques

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This is a fantastic antique Victorian chaise longue, circa 1860 in date.

It has beautiful hand carved solid walnut decoration, and rests on elegant cabriole legs, typical of the Victorian period.

We have a selection of fine fabrics to choose from so this chaise can be customised according to your specification if required.

Condition:

In excellent condition, please see photos for confirmation of condition.




Dimensions in cm:

Height 83 x Width 194 x Depth 76

Dimensions in inches:

Height 32.7 x Width 76.4 x Depth 29.9
A chaise longue is an upholstered sofa in the shape of a chair that is long enough to support the legs. The architect, Le Corbusier designed Chaise Longue, LC-4 - Chaise longue "Long chair" which has become a classic item.

It is thought that the first blend of a chair and daybed originated in Egypt. The earliest known models were made from palm sticks lashed together with pieces of cord or rawhide. Later, Egyptian bed-makers introduced mortise-and-tenon construction and wood bed frames veneered with ivory or ebony, in common use with many examples being found in the 1st dynasty (3100–2890 BC) tombs.

Ancient Greek art depicts gods and goddesses lounging in this type of chair. The Greeks changed from the normal practice of sitting at a table to the far more distinctive practice of reclining on couches as early as the 8th century BC.

The Romans also used a daybed for reclining in the daytime and to sleep on at night. At Roman banquets, the usual number of persons occupying each bed was three, with three daybeds forming three sides of a small square, so that the triclinium. The Romans did not practice upholstery, so the couches were made comfortable with pillows, loose covers and animal skins.

Modern types of chaise lounge include:

Duchesse brisée (Broken duchess in French): this word is used when the chaise longue is divided in two parts: the chair and a long footstool, or two chairs with a stool in between them.
Récamier: a récamier has two raised ends, and nothing on the long sides. It is sometimes associated with French Empire (neo-classical) style. It’s named after French society hostess Madame Récamier (1777–1849), who posed elegantly on a couch of this kind. She had her portrait painted in 1800. The shape of the récamier is similar to a traditional lit bateau (boat bed) but made for the drawing room, not the bedroom.
Méridienne: a méridienne has a high head-rest, and a lower foot-rest, joined by a sloping piece. Whether or not they have anything at the foot end, méridiennes are asymmetrical day-beds. They were popular in the grand houses of France in the early 19th century. Its name is from its typical use: rest in the middle of the day, when the sun is near the meridian.
The Walnut woods are probably the most recognisable and popular of all the exotic woods, having been used in furniture making for many centuries. Walnut veneer was highly priced and the cost would reflect the ‘fanciness’ of the veneer – the more decorative, then the more expensive and desirable.
Stock Code
04948
Regent Antiques

Regent Antiques
Manor Warehouse
318 Green Lanes
London
N4 1BX

+44 (0)20 8802 3900
+44 (0)7836 294074
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