Antique Victorian Oak Dining Table & 12 Chairs c.1870
Antique Victorian Oak Dining Table & 12 Chairs c.1870
Antique Victorian Oak Dining Table & 12 Chairs c.1870
Antique Victorian Oak Dining Table & 12 Chairs c.1870
Antique Victorian Oak Dining Table & 12 Chairs c.1870
Antique Victorian Oak Dining Table & 12 Chairs c.1870
Antique Victorian Oak Dining Table & 12 Chairs c.1870
Antique Victorian Oak Dining Table & 12 Chairs c.1870
Antique Victorian Oak Dining Table & 12 Chairs c.1870
Antique Victorian Oak Dining Table & 12 Chairs c.1870
Antique Victorian Oak Dining Table & 12 Chairs c.1870

Antique Victorian Oak Dining Table & 12 Chairs c.1870

c. 1870 England

Offered by Regent Antiques

£12,850 gbp
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This is a rare opportunity to own an English antique Victorian Scottish oak dining or conference table, circa 1870 in date, with the original set of twelve matching dining chairs.

This table is very versatile and has five original leaves which can easily be added or removed as required to suit the occasion. The turned and fluted legs have been beautifully hand carved and sit on their original brass and brown porcelain castors.

This dining set was made from solid oak by a master craftsman, and should last for generations more. Take a look at the amazing system of runners that pull out as you extend the table with it's brilliant winding mechanism.

The matching set of twelve solid Scottish oak dining chairs comprises ten side chairs and a pair of armchairs. The chairs have been beautifully hand carved with fluted front legs that terminate in the original brass and brown porcelain castors.

The seats and backs have been upholstered in sumptuous blue leather and the backs have been centred with an interesting gilded thistle and crown motif.

This set has been beautifully French polished to bring out the wonderful blonde colour of the oak, and the chairs were upholstered in beautiful blue leather and they compliment the table perfectly.


Condition:

In really excellent original condition, please see photos for confirmation.


Dimensions in cm:

Height 74 x Width 405 x Depth 145 - when fully extended

Height 74 x Width 168 x Depth 145 - when closed

Height 89 x Width 59 x Depth 59 - Armchair

Height 91 x Width 49 x Depth 59 - Side chair

Dimensions in inches:

Height 29.1 x Width 159.4 x Depth 57.1 - when fully extended

Height 29.1 x Width 66.1 x Depth 57.1 - when closed

Height 35.0 x Width 23.2 x Depth 23.2 - Armchair

Height 35.8 x Width 19.3 x Depth 23.2 - Side chair
Characteristics of Scottish Oak

Scottish oak generally has a wilder and more characterful grain than European oak, with more pippiness and occasional burr. It can be difficult to get very long straight lengths. Scottish oak was used to make windows and doors in the Glencoe Visitor Centre.

Strength & Structure

Grain: Oak is normally straight grained, although this varies according to growing conditions. Generally, forest grown oak will be straight grained, but in oak grown in isolation or in small or sparsely populated woods (which often applies to Scottish oak), the direction of the grain may be less predictable. If you need oak for structural purposes, the direction of the grain is important.


Oak
is a tree or shrub in the genus Quercus - Latin "oak tree" having approximately 600 extant species. Oak wood has a density of about 0.75 g/cm3, great strength and hardness, and is very resistant to insect and fungal attack because of its high tannin content. It also has very appealing grain markings, particularly when quartersawn. Oak wood is very durable, easy to maintain and resistant to wear and tear which is why it can be easily handed to the next generations if taken well care of.

Oak wood virtually lasts forever and you can still admire oak furniture in museums and palaces even if it was made many centuries ago. Oak has been prized since the Middle Ages for use in interior panelling of prestigious buildings such as the debating chamber of the House of Commons in London and in the construction of fine furniture.


Winding Mechanism for extending tables
A man by the name of Samuel Hawkins applied for a patent on a screw expander on June 6th, 1861. Presumably, Mr. Hawkins either died or retired because his business was taken over by a young machinist named Joseph Fitter in 1864.
Joseph Fitter operated a machinist shop where he produced winding mechanisms for extending tables as well as screw expanders for piano stools and other applications at 210 Cheapside, Birmingham England by the name of Britannia Works.



Our reference: 06076
Stock Code
06076
Regent Antiques

Regent Antiques
Manor Warehouse
318 Green Lanes
London
N4 1BX

+44 (0)20 8802 3900
+44 (0)7836 294074
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