Charles II Ring Turned Pearwood Arm Chair
Charles II Ring Turned Pearwood Arm Chair
Charles II Ring Turned Pearwood Arm Chair
Charles II Ring Turned Pearwood Arm Chair
Charles II Ring Turned Pearwood Arm Chair

In the manner of RICHARD PRICE (worked 1670-1684)

Charles II Ring Turned Pearwood Arm Chair

c. 1670 to 1680 England

Offered by Thomas Coulborn & Sons

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With block terminals. Featuring unusual spindle and graduated spindle turning instead of commonly knob and ball turning. With double front stretchers and a rare poker work decorated seat with a circle and initials ‘SD’.

Bowett notes that, in 1671, the joiner Richard Price supplied the first frames of chairs and stools which were described as ‘turned all over’ on his bills. Until this time, chairs were given turned fore-legs, arm supports and occasionally back legs, but the rest of the frame was square or rectangular in section. For chairs which were ‘turned all over’, all the exposed elements of the frame were turned, including the stretchers, fore-rail and rear posts. The chair is robustly built incorporating two parallel front and side stretchers, a design which Price called ‘double rayled’ (Adam Bowett, ‘English Furniture 1660 – 1714: From Charles II to Queen Anne’ (Antique Collectors’ Club, 2002), pp.69-70).

The comparators illustrated in the texts below all have similar block terminals to our chair. However, our example is unusual as the maker has used ‘ring’ turning, which is very rare, rather than the more commonly seen ‘bobbin’ or ‘ball’ turning, or ‘twist’ turning as in the other examples.

In his book ‘100 British Chairs’, Adam Bowett illustrates a chair, dated c.1670-1700, with ball-turning on the legs, stretchers and around the seat, and twist turning on the back. (Adam Bowett (ed.), ‘100 British Chairs’ (Antique Collectors' Club, 2015), page 30, figure 14). Unusually our chair, unlike all many other examples, has decorative turned supports which extend all the way from the seat to the top rail on the back of the chair.

Victor Chinnery includes a joined backstool dated c.1675 in ‘Oak Furniture: The British Tradition’ ((Antique Collectors’ Club, 1990), p.280, figure. 3:138). He notes that the introduction of the high front stretcher became very common after 1660. Unusually, our chair has both a high and a low stretcher at both the front and the back, unlike the other examples which Chinnery illustrates.

Ralph Edwards depicts a number of examples of turned chairs in ‘The Dictionary of English Furniture: Volume One’ ((Antique Collectors’ Club, 1983), pp.240-241, figures 46-49). Tobias Jellinek also illustrates a turned chair in ‘Early British Chairs and Seats’ (Antique Collectors’ Club in association with Crab Tree Farm, 2009), p. 21, figure 3. Our chair stands out, being an armchair and having turned arms and supports. Unlike our chair, the chairs which Edwards and Jellinek illustrate also do not have the double front and rear stretchers.

Richard Price (fl. 1660-77): Richard Price was a joiner who supplied furniture to the Crown. His name appears in the Lord Chamberlain’s accounts from 1670 to 1684 and the bills include detailed descriptions of the chairs which he made. Bowett notes that, from the 1670s, ‘the pace of stylistic change quickened and in 1671 Price supplied the first frames of chairs and stools ‘turned all over’. Hitherto, backstools and elbow chairs had turned fore-legs and arm supports, and sometime turned back legs, but the rest of the frame was square or rectangular in section. On chairs ‘turned all over’, all exposed elements of the frame were turned, including stretchers, fore-rail and rear posts.’ (Adam Bowett, ‘English Furniture 1660 – 1714: From Charles II to Queen Anne’ (Antique Collectors’ Club, 2002), p.69).

One back toe restored.
Bibliography:
Victor Chinnery, ‘Oak Furniture: The British Tradition’ (Antique Collectors’ Club, 1990)
Adam Bowett, ‘English Furniture 1660 – 1714: From Charles II to Queen Anne’ (Antique Collectors’ Club, 2002)
Adam Bowett (ed.), ‘100 British Chairs’ (Antique Collectors' Club, 2015)
Ralph Edwards, ‘The Dictionary of English Furniture: Volume One’ (Antique Collectors’ Club, 1983)
Tobias Jellinek, ‘Early British Chairs and Seats’ (Antique Collectors’ Club in association with Crab Tree Farm, 2009)
Dimensions
Height 92.00 cm (36.22 inches)
Width 53.50 cm (21.06 inches)
Depth 52.00 cm (20.47 inches)
Stock Code
6428
Medium
Pear wood
Thomas Coulborn & Sons

Thomas Coulborn & Sons
Vesey Manor
64 Birmingham Road
Sutton Coldfield
West Midlands
B72 1QP
England

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