Cornelis Troost. Portrait of a Family in an Interior
Cornelis Troost. Portrait of a Family in an Interior

Cornelis Troost. Portrait of a Family in an Interior

c. 1740 Netherlands

Offered by Isherwood Fine Art Ltd

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A family portrait in an interior of a gentleman, seated, his son feeding a parrot at a side table, his wife, seated and holding their young daughter whilst offering her an apple, a park visible beyond the open door. Oil on canvas in a period giltwood frame, c. 1740.

Dimensions: 90 x 116cms (35.5 x 45.5in)

Cornelis Troost (Amsterdam 1696-1750) was Dutch painter, printmaker and draughtsman, active mainly in Amsterdam. He was a pupil of the portrait painter Arnold Boonen for several years. He made his name with a lively group portrait of the Amsterdam Inspectors of the Collegium Medicum (1724, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam) and continued to enjoy success as a formal portraitist and painter of 'conversation pieces', working in pastel and gouache as well as oil. He also painted other numerous types of paintings, including theatrical subjects as he had close connections with the theatre having married an actress and acted professionally in his youth. Troost has been described as the 'Dutch Hogarth', buy unlike Hogarth, his genre scenes tended to be more humorous rather than having a moralistic theme. Troost was considered responsible for the revival of the 'conversation piece' in Holland and his style of painting became very popular when compared to traditional family portraits by artists such as Jan Maurits Quinkhard. This painting seen here, with its accent on convivial domesticity and the importance of the common living room as the focus for family life is dated to around 1740 by which time Troost had abandoned his more elaborate style of the late 1720's and early '30's for a more retrained and naturalistic composition.

Jacques Goudstikker (1897-1940) was a prominent and successful Jewish art dealer in Amsterdam prior to World War II, who helped to shape the taste of his age. In 1940, as the Germans moved in and occupied Amsterdam, Goudstikker was forced to flee his home and abandon his gallery, which contained approximately 1,400 works of art, most of which he had meticulously recorded in a black book which he managed to escape with. Goudstikker unfortunately died on a cargo ship in a tragic accident whilst fleeing across the English channel, while his wife, Desi, was forced to continue her journey on to the States with their three year old son, Edo, taking the black book with her. The gallery in Amsterdam was soon after looted by the Nazis but many of the paintings were found in Germany and returned by the Allied Forces to the Dutch government just after the War which were held in the Dutch national collection. Many legal battles later, in 2007, some 200 paintings (including this painting) were restituted by the Dutch government to the heirs of Jacques Goudstikker. The search by the family and the historians and legal team who support them continues for the approximately 1,000 other paintings recorded in the black book, with many works unfortunately having been sold on in the German art market immediately after the War and dispersed throughout museums, institutions and private collections around the world.

'Troost, Cornelis' The Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artista, Ed Ian Chilvers. Oxford University Press, 2009.
The Jewish Museum, New York 'Reclaimed: Paintings from the Collection of Jacques Goudstikker', 2009.

Paul Henckels, Solingen
Mathias and Paul Henckels; Lempertz, Cologne 16-18 December 1895, lot 175
With Jacques Goudstikker, Amsterdam, 1928
Looted by the Nazi authorities, December 1940
Restituted after the War by Allied Forces to Dutch government
Restituted to Goudstikker family May 2007

Height 90.00 cm (35.43 inches)
Width 116.00 cm (45.67 inches)
Stock Code
Oil on canvas in a giltwood frame
Isherwood Fine Art Ltd

Isherwood Fine Art Ltd
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