English Oil on Canvas Depicting an Otherworldly Scene Near Paddock Wood in Kent of the ‘Aurora Borealis’
English Oil on Canvas Depicting an Otherworldly Scene Near Paddock Wood in Kent of the ‘Aurora Borealis’
English Oil on Canvas Depicting an Otherworldly Scene Near Paddock Wood in Kent of the ‘Aurora Borealis’
English Oil on Canvas Depicting an Otherworldly Scene Near Paddock Wood in Kent of the ‘Aurora Borealis’

English Oil on Canvas Depicting an Otherworldly Scene Near Paddock Wood in Kent of the ‘Aurora Borealis’

1900 to 2000 England

Offered by Finch & Co

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An Unusual English Oil on Canvas Depicting an Otherworldly Scene Near Paddock Wood in Kent of the ‘Aurora Borealis’ or Northern Lights Showing Red, Blue and Purple Waves Twirling Around the Stars in the Night Sky
A label to the reverse inscribed: ‘Aurora Borealis’ Jan 25 1938 seen from Paddock Wood. Display began about 6pm faint greenish light on northern horizon. At 7pm green-light had brightened and red patches appeared in W.N.W. and E.N.E. glow extended up sky until at 8.30 three quarters of sky was affected (stars disappeared) Only the southern quarter being normal. At one time broad bands of light stretched across zenith from W. to E. display faded at 9 but returned with brighter colours at midnight’
Oil on canvas laid on board
Circa 1938

Size: 24cm high, 57cm wide - 9½ ins high, 22½ ins wide / 43cm high, 75cm wide - 17 ins high, 29½ ins wide (framed)
The term ‘aurora borealis’ was given by Galileo in 1619 to the dazzling phenomenon of the northern lights and was derived from the name of the Roman Goddess of the dawn and the classical Greek name for the North wind. There exists an identical southern counterpart known as the ‘aurora australis’, or southern lights which is visible from high latitudes in Chile, Argentina, New Zealand, Australia and Antarctica. Predominantly seen around regions in the Arctic and Antarctic, this English occurrence of the phenomenon was very unusual.
Resulting in a dancing otherworldly celestial light show, the aurora borealis starts from 60 to 250 miles high up in the earth’s atmosphere when electrically charged particles released from the sun enter the upper atmosphere and become trapped in the earth's magnetic field where they collide with gases such as oxygen and nitrogen. Characterised by streamers of reddish or greenish light, it occurs most often near the northern or southern magnetic poles. The most spectacular natural light display to be seen in the earth’s sky, it occurs near equinoxes in March and September. Dark, moonless, clear and unpolluted skies are essential to viewing the aurora. Known in Scotland as the ‘Mirrie Dancers’ the lights can often be seen in the far north west where light pollution is at a minimum.
Medium
Oil on canvas
Finch & Co

Finch & Co
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