Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.
Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.

Floral marquetry longcase clock, signed John Bayley, London.

1700 London.

Offered by Neill Robinson Blaxill F.B.H.I.

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Eight-day movement with a twelve inch brass dial. The dial still retains it’s original fire gilding and its still possible to see where the amalgam was applied to the back and sides of the dial plate. The dial is also enhanced by a fine pair of blued steel hands, cherub spandrels and ringed winding holes. Detail of the internal count wheel, which governs the strike, can be seen in the pictures of the movement as can some other facets of late 17th century clockmaking. Generally speaking more time and creativity was put into the individual components, good examples are the ringed and finned movement pillars but detail can be seen on the hammer-stop and spring.

The oak carcase is veneered in walnut with floral marquetry panels. Although now faded, when new the veneers would have been incredibly vibrant. Floral marquetry was intended to be as bright and vivid as the natural flora and fauna and in order to achieve this a number of differing materials and techniques were employed. Diarist John Evelyn in the 1670 edition of Silva notes the lack of indigenous woods that were naturally coloured, “..beside the Berbery for yellow, and Holly for white we have very few; our inlayers use Fustic, Locust, or Acacia; Brasile, Prince and Rosewood for Yellow and Reds, with several others brought here from both the Indies”. If colours could not be achieved by the use of imported wood then home grown timber with a plain grain such as sycamore or pear could be stained using a wide array of recipes. Subtle variation and shading was achieved by laying the pieces of marquetry in hot sand, carefully manipulating and removing the leaves once the desired contrasts had been obtained. At one time the case employed a rising hood, which lifted up on wooden runners to the side of the back board but as was often the way, the door is now fitted with conventional hinges and lock; making winding and adjustments much easier.

John Bayley was born in circa 1678, he was apprenticed to Edward Hunt in 1692 and freed in 1700.
Fully restored movement with a two year guarantee. Restoration to damaged marquetry on the bottom of the base. The case retains it's original base and has not been cut down and replaced.
Dimensions
Height 207.00 cm (81.50 inches)
Width 50.00 cm (19.69 inches)
Depth 26.00 cm (10.24 inches)
Neill Robinson Blaxill F.B.H.I.

Neill Robinson Blaxill F.B.H.I.
21 St Johns Hill
Sevenoaks
Kent
TN13 3NX

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