French Stipple Engraving by Savigny of the Imperial Eagle, Description de l'Egypte. 1809-1813.
French Stipple Engraving by Savigny of the Imperial Eagle, Description de l'Egypte. 1809-1813.
French Stipple Engraving by Savigny of the Imperial Eagle, Description de l'Egypte. 1809-1813.
French Stipple Engraving by Savigny of the Imperial Eagle, Description de l'Egypte. 1809-1813.
French Stipple Engraving by Savigny of the Imperial Eagle, Description de l'Egypte. 1809-1813.
French Stipple Engraving by Savigny of the Imperial Eagle, Description de l'Egypte. 1809-1813.

French Stipple Engraving by Savigny of the Imperial Eagle, Description de l'Egypte. 1809-1813.

1809 to 1813 France

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French Stipple Engraving of the Imperial Eagle from the Description de l'Egypte.
J. Ces. Savigny,
1809-1813

The stipple engraving depicts the Imperial Eagle ~ This is Aquila heliaca or the Eastern Imperial Eagle. It is the species whose image is used on the coins of the Ptolemies. The bird of prey was sometimes associated with Hathor from Histoire Naturelle - Birds - Plate 12.



Dimensions: Height: 32 3/4 inches x 25 1/4 inches


'Description de l'Egypte', the seminal publication by the French government detailing the results of Napoleon's pioneering military and scientific expedition to Egypt (1798-1801) and the first comprehensive illustrated description of ancient and modern Egypt.

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From: (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Description_de_l'%C3%89gypte)

The Description de l'Égypte (English: Description of Egypt) was a series of publications, appearing first in 1809 and continuing until the final volume appeared in 1829, which offered a comprehensive scientific description of ancient and modern Egypt as well as its natural history. It is the collaborative work of about 160 civilian scholars and scientists, known popularly as the savants, who accompanied Napoleon's expedition to Egypt in 1798 to 1801 as part of the French Revolutionary Wars, as well as about 2000 artists and technicians, including 400 engravers, who would later compile it into a full work.

The full title of the work is Description de l'Égypte, ou Recueil des observations et des recherches qui ont été faites en Égypte pendant l'expédition de l'armée française (English: Description of Egypt, or the collection of observations and research which was made in Egypt during the expedition of the French Army).

Summary

Approximately 160 civilian scholars and scientists, many drawn from the Institut de France, collaborated on the Description. Collectively they comprised the Commission des Sciences et Arts d'Égypte. About a third of them would later also become members of the Institute of Egypt.

In late August 1798, on the order of Napoleon, the Institute of Egypt (l'Institut d'Égypte) was founded in the palace of Hassan-Kashif on the outskirts of Cairo, with Gaspard Monge as president.[1] The structure of the institute was based on the Institut de France. The institute housed a library, laboratories, workshops, and the savants' various Egyptian collections. The workshop was particularly important, supplying both the army as well as the servants with necessary equipment. Many new instruments were constructed as well, to replace those lost during the sinking of the French fleet in August 1798 at Aboukir Bay (Battle of the Nile) and the Cairo riot of October 1798.
One of the goals of the Institute was to propagate knowledge. To this end, the savants published a journal, La Decade Egyptienne, as well as a newspaper, the Courier de L'Egypte, which disseminated information about the French occupation and the activities of the French army, the Commission des Sciences et Arts d'Égypte, and the Institute itself.

The vision of a single comprehensive publication amalgamating all that the French discovered in Egypt was conceived already in November 1798, when Joseph Fourier was entrusted with the task of uniting the reports from the various disciplines for later publication. When the French army left Egypt in 1801, the savants took with them a large quantities of unpublished notes, drawings, and various collections of smaller artifacts that they could smuggle unnoticed past the British.

In February 1802, at the instigation of Jean Antoine Chaptal, the French Minister of the Interior, and by decree of Napoleon, a commission was established to manage the preparation of the large amount of data for a single publication. The final work would draw data from the already-published journal La Decade, the newspaper Courier de L'Égypte, the four-volume Mémoires sur l'Égypte (an expansion of the La Decade journal, published by the French government during and after the Egyptian campaign) and an abundance of notes and illustrations from the various scholars and scientists. The huge volume of information to be published meant adopting an apparently haphazard modus operandi: when sufficiently many plates or text on a particular subject were ready, the information was published. Despite this, publication of the first edition took over 20 years.
Dimensions
Height 32.75 inch (83.18 cm)
Width 25.25 inch (64.13 cm)
Stock Code
ny7284
Medium
paper
Signed/Inscribed
The plate has in the top left N.H. Zoologie Oiseau par J. Ces Savigny (the image was created by Savigny). To the top right is Pl 12. The engraver's name Bouquet Snr. is found to bottom right.
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