Mahogany longcase clock signed Thomas Ollive, Cranbrook.
Mahogany longcase clock signed Thomas Ollive, Cranbrook.
Mahogany longcase clock signed Thomas Ollive, Cranbrook.
Mahogany longcase clock signed Thomas Ollive, Cranbrook.
Mahogany longcase clock signed Thomas Ollive, Cranbrook.
Mahogany longcase clock signed Thomas Ollive, Cranbrook.
Mahogany longcase clock signed Thomas Ollive, Cranbrook.
Mahogany longcase clock signed Thomas Ollive, Cranbrook.
Mahogany longcase clock signed Thomas Ollive, Cranbrook.
Mahogany longcase clock signed Thomas Ollive, Cranbrook.
Mahogany longcase clock signed Thomas Ollive, Cranbrook.
Mahogany longcase clock signed Thomas Ollive, Cranbrook.

Mahogany longcase clock signed Thomas Ollive, Cranbrook.

1780 Cranbrook

Offered by Neill Robinson Blaxill F.B.H.I.

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Eight-day movement with some intersting features. Thomas Ollive’s brother Samuel was a clockmaker and gunsmith a few miles from Cranbrook in Tonbridge Kent. In September 1780 he took out and advert in the Kentish Gazette; “Samuel Ollive,Tunbridge, in Kent, Takes the liberty of acquainting the public, that he makes Clocks……They go for eight days, shew the hours and minutes, and by means of pulling a line, which may be conveyed from the clock to any room in the house, strike the hours the same as an eight day clock. Price 2£.5s.- with a case, 3£.6s. N.B. As the beating is disagreeable to some people, they may (if required) be made to go silent.” The functions described by Samuel are not typically found in most clocks of this period but they are included in this clock by Thomas. The strike repeat is activated by pulling the lever on the right hand side of the movement, this is connected to a cord which can in theory with the addition of some pulleys, be threaded to another room in the house. There are records of the cord going through a hole in the ceiling so that the strike can be activated in the bedrooms above, informing the puller of the last hour struck. The disagreeable beating mentioned is not the tick tocking of the movement but the strike of the hammer on bell every hour. The clock can put onto silent mode by turning the hand at the top of the dial 180 degrees to either strike or silent.
Another unusual feature, not described by Samuel, is the centre date hand. This nicely made component has a 31 tooth wheel which sits in front of the hour wheel. The wheel is held in place by a brass jumper spring, which gives the hand a positive action and makes the date easy to change. The days are engraved inside the hour chapters. The dial is a single piece of cast and hammered sheet brass, with floral swags decorating the spandrels. The engraving is filled with a hard black, which contrasts well with the lightly grained and silvered dial surface.
The solid mahogany case has good proportions with some fine curl veneers used on the front door and base, which now have a good patina and colour. A typical Kentish feature is the piecrust cresting at the top of the hood, the detail of which is particularly fine. The hood is also adorned with two fluted columns capped with Corinthian capitals.
Another interesting piece of Ollive family history is the fact that Samuel and Thomas’s sister Elizabeth was married to Thomas Paine, author of the Rights of Man. The Ollive family had a tobacco business in Lewes, sussex and when Paine arrived in 1768 to take up the post of exciseman, he lodged with the family.

Full working order with a two year guarantee.
Dimensions
Height 210.00 cm (82.68 inches)
Width 48.00 cm (18.90 inches)
Depth 24.00 cm (9.45 inches)
Neill Robinson Blaxill F.B.H.I.

Neill Robinson Blaxill F.B.H.I.
21 St Johns Hill
Sevenoaks
Kent
TN13 3NX

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