Pair of Antique Ceremonial Maces in Old Sheffield Plate
Pair of Antique Ceremonial Maces in Old Sheffield Plate
Pair of Antique Ceremonial Maces in Old Sheffield Plate
Pair of Antique Ceremonial Maces in Old Sheffield Plate
Pair of Antique Ceremonial Maces in Old Sheffield Plate
Pair of Antique Ceremonial Maces in Old Sheffield Plate
Pair of Antique Ceremonial Maces in Old Sheffield Plate
Pair of Antique Ceremonial Maces in Old Sheffield Plate
Pair of Antique Ceremonial Maces in Old Sheffield Plate
Pair of Antique Ceremonial Maces in Old Sheffield Plate
Pair of Antique Ceremonial Maces in Old Sheffield Plate

Pair of Antique Ceremonial Maces in Old Sheffield Plate

1830 England

Offered by waxantiques

£1,550 gbp
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A rare pair of antique ceremonial maces with detachable wooden poles. The silvered globular tops are mounted with very heavy and ornate gilded top pieces decorated with dolphins and with a cross at the top. Height of top pieces 12.5 cms and 15 cms. Height when assembled 87.5 cms and 101 cms. Length of poles 75 cms. Made in Old Sheffield Plate. Circa 1830.
These antique ceremonial maces are in very good condition with no damage or restoration. Although a pair, there is a difference in height due to the gilded top piece of the shorter one being slightly “squashed” and not having a globular piece between the cross and the dolphins. This is probably how they were made. Also, when the pole is inserted it fits further inside the shorter one than the longer one. The silver is not worn – they have been replated. The gilt is original, is not worn and has a good colour.

Please note that this item is not new and will show moderate signs of wear commensurate with age. Reflections in the photograph may detract from the true representation of this item.
The ceremonial mace is a highly ornamented staff of metal or wood, carried before a sovereign or other high official in civic ceremonies by a mace-bearer, intended to represent the official's authority. The mace, as used today, derives from the original mace used as a weapon. Processions often feature maces, as on parliamentary or formal academic occasions. The ceremonial mace was used as a symbol of authority of military commanders.

The earliest ceremonial maces were practical weapons intended to protect the king's person, borne by the Sergeants-at-Arms, a royal bodyguard established in France by Philip II, and in England probably by Richard I. By the 14th century, these sergeants' maces had started to become increasingly decorative, encased in precious metals. The mace as a real weapon went out of use with the disappearance of heavy armour.
Stock Code
7831
Medium
old sheffield plate
waxantiques

waxantiques
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+44 (0)7904 297419
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