Rare collection of five Wriggle-work Marriage Plates
Rare collection of five Wriggle-work Marriage Plates
Rare collection of five Wriggle-work Marriage Plates
Rare collection of five Wriggle-work Marriage Plates
Rare collection of five Wriggle-work Marriage Plates

Rare collection of five Wriggle-work Marriage Plates

c. 1710 England

Offered by Thomas Coulborn & Sons

Sold
Request Information Call Dealer
Favourite Item
Comprising:
1st pair: A pair of early 18th century Wriggle-work Plates, decorated to the well with a single flowering tulip, the single-reed rim with zig-zag decoration, bearing touchmarks, hallmarks, and label of James Hitchman (w.1701-1735), (OP2340, PS4671), to reverse.

2nd pair: A pair of early 18th century Wriggle-work Plates, one decorated to the well with a peacock amongst stylized flowers, the other with a peahen also amongst stylized flowers, both with zig-zag decoration to the single-reeded rim, touchmarks, hallmarks and label of James Hitchman, (w.1701-1735), (OP2340, PS4671), to reverse.

An early 18th century Wriggle-work Plate decorated to the well with a peahen amongst stylized flowers, zig-zag decoration to the single-reeded rim, touchmarks, hallmarks and label of James Hitchman, (w.1701-1735), (OP2340, PS4671), to reverse.

James Hitchman (d.1735) is known as the foremost pewterer producing wriggle-work plates in London in the early 18th Century. He obtained freedom (or joined the Yeomanry) in 1701. Such plates are thought to have been marriage plates, presented to the bride and groom to commemorate their nuptials and indeed the depiction of the peacock and the peahen on the plates here were incorporated as symbols of fertility. The wriggle-work decoration is achieved after casting the plate by the pewterer a flat scorper at an angle, and rocking it to and fro in a regular fashion to create the line. Wriggle-work plates are scarce and to find a collection of five is almost unknown. Two examples by James Hitchman are in the Pewter Collection at Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia. Another small group from the Little Collection of Early English Pewter were sold at Christie’s in 2007. The Metropolitan Museum has a pewter wriggle-work plate by James Hitchman, measuring 8.5 inches (21.6cm) in diameter, with a very similar design to our peacock amongst stylised flowers (Accession Number: 06.849).

Pewter: Pewter is an alloy (a mixture of different metals) of which the main component is tin. To this is added various proportions of copper, lead, bismuth, antimony and other metals. Cornwall was one of the principal sources of tin in the Middle Ages, and English pewter had an international reputation for high quality. Pewter was used principally for useful domestic items such as candlesticks, flagons, cups, dishes and plates. But it was also used for 'display' wares such as large dishes, or chargers, that were set out on the buffet and never used.

‘Wriggle-work’: 'Wriggle-work' is decoration made using a flat bladed tool, walked from point to point over the surface of the metal, to produce incised, zigzag lines of engraving. Wriggle-work was fashionable in England and the Netherlands between 1660 and 1730. Most wriggle-work decoration depicts flowers, birds and animals in the spirit of late 17th-century needlework and delftware. Similarities in design suggest that engravers used established patterns to decorated dishes, tankards and beakers. As no two designs are identical, they were probably applied freehand. In general, customers in shops or at fairs probably bought blank items and chose their decoration.
Cyril Fletcher Grant, Aylesford Rectory and thence by descent.
Dimensions
Height 8.50 inch (21.59 cm)
Stock Code
5832
Medium
Wriggle-work, pewter
Signed/Inscribed
Touchmarks, hallmarks and label of James Hitchman
Thomas Coulborn & Sons

Thomas Coulborn & Sons
Vesey Manor
64 Birmingham Road
Sutton Coldfield
West Midlands
B72 1QP
England

+44 (0)121-354 3974
+44 (0)7941 252299
Favourite Dealer
Request Dealer Alerts
Opening Hours
Contacts
View Dealer Location
Member Since 2006
Members of
View Full Details