Salt-Glazed Teapot with Jacobite Symbolism
Salt-Glazed Teapot with Jacobite Symbolism
Salt-Glazed Teapot with Jacobite Symbolism
Salt-Glazed Teapot with Jacobite Symbolism
Salt-Glazed Teapot with Jacobite Symbolism
Salt-Glazed Teapot with Jacobite Symbolism
Salt-Glazed Teapot with Jacobite Symbolism
Salt-Glazed Teapot with Jacobite Symbolism
Salt-Glazed Teapot with Jacobite Symbolism

Salt-Glazed Teapot with Jacobite Symbolism

c. 1750 England

Offered by Bardith

US$6,500 usd
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An antique salt-glazed teapot made in Staffordshire England in the mid-18th century. The salt-glazed teapot is beautifully painted. Made in the pectin shape with fine relief molded shell, acorn, and oak leaf decoration painted with translucent enamels. The piece is very finely potted with a delicate application of the enamels. The mid-18th century pectin (scalloped shell) shape of this tea pot is an excellent example of the work of the Staffordshire potters who embraced rococo forms inspired by nature.
This is truly a rare gem because of its important Scottish Jacobite symbolism. On 3 September 1651 at the Battle of Worcester, Charles II, the newly-crowned King of Scotland and son of Charles I, was beaten by Oliver Cromwell’s Parliamentarian army. Some 5,000 of Charles' troops were killed or captured during the battle, and 21-year-old Charles was lucky to escape with his life. He fled with a few of his most trusted men in an attempt to find safety. He found an excellent hiding place in a large oak tree. at Boscobel. Charles ultimately spent six weeks on the run before he reached the coast, set sail and eventually landed in France.
Our teapot tells this story. It is painted with acorns and oak leaves which refer to the oak tree in Boscobel where Charles hid while his enemies searched the forest below him. At the top of the teapot is a painted figure of a nobleman holding a chalice of wine at arms length. Since it was treason within Scotland to support the exiled Charles, Jacobites established rituals and symbols to establish their allegiance. The most famous was the toast “to the king over the water” – where the drinker would raise their glass as shown by the figure on this teapot and symbolically toast Bonnie Prince Charlie over the English channel in France.
Use in the home of objects with Scottish symbolism such as this tea pot was a private way for a prosperous family to assert Scottish national identity.
An example of a similar tea pot can be found in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. See 34.165.95 a,b.


Excellent: invisible restoration to tiny chips at the top edge where the cover sits
Dimensions
Height 5.50 inch (13.97 cm)
Width 4.25 inch (10.79 cm)
Depth 7.50 inch (19.05 cm)
Medium
Salt-Glazed Stoneware
Bardith

Bardith
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