Three train quarter striking musical bracket clock signed Septimus Miles , London.
Three train quarter striking musical bracket clock signed Septimus Miles , London.
Three train quarter striking musical bracket clock signed Septimus Miles , London.
Three train quarter striking musical bracket clock signed Septimus Miles , London.
Three train quarter striking musical bracket clock signed Septimus Miles , London.
Three train quarter striking musical bracket clock signed Septimus Miles , London.
Three train quarter striking musical bracket clock signed Septimus Miles , London.
Three train quarter striking musical bracket clock signed Septimus Miles , London.
Three train quarter striking musical bracket clock signed Septimus Miles , London.
Three train quarter striking musical bracket clock signed Septimus Miles , London.
Three train quarter striking musical bracket clock signed Septimus Miles , London.

Three train quarter striking musical bracket clock signed Septimus Miles , London.

1827 Ludgate Street London.

Offered by Neill Robinson Blaxill F.B.H.I.

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The three-train fusee movement is of a high quality, one of the more complicated pieces made by Thwaites and Reed the famous clockmakers who had supplied so many clock movements to the London trade since 1761. Each quarter is sounded on eight bells; this increases in duration until the full sequence is played just before the hour is struck. The melody is, like many tunes used in eight-bell chimes in this period, based on the peels of St Mary-Le-Bow. By the Victorian period these had become synthesised into what came to be known as Whittington chimes, after the famous thrice Lord Mayor of London, who they extolled to “turn again.” If the chimes need to be silenced turning the steel hand in half-round, break-arch dial can disengage them. The movement can be attributed to Thwaites and Reed by the use of their well-documented numbering system. The front plate and barrel covers are stamped 7866 which approximately date this clock to 1827.
The case is of an oak carcase veneered in mahogany with curl veneers on the front panels and pad-top, which are set against the convex brass sight rings. Fish scale frets backed with silk are fitted to the sides of the case to allow the sound of the bells to travel.

There are a number of stylistic features on this clock that became popular and well established in the late Georgian period. The brass sheet-silvered dial with engraved floral festoons and the single pad-top and handled case first appeared in the 1780's but like many successful designs their popularity continued for a number of decades especially with makers of well established businesses. Septimus Miles was made free of the Clockmakers Company in 1797 and the family traded from 32, Ludgate Street for over fifty years. There is a testament by him in the Old Bailey records of 1808 after a 19-year-old William Smith had tried to steal a watch worth £7 from the premises; he described himself as watchmaker. Smith was found guilty and fined one shilling. In 1817 it was Septimus’s brother Stephen who was giving evidence to another attempted theft of a watch, this time a 29 year old William Thompson, who was found guilty, confined for six months and whipped. Despite pleading in his defence that; “I was in great distress.”
Fully restored with a two year guarantee.
Dimensions
Height 46.00 cm (18.11 inches)
Width 29.00 cm (11.42 inches)
Depth 18.00 cm (7.09 inches)
Neill Robinson Blaxill F.B.H.I.

Neill Robinson Blaxill F.B.H.I.
21 St Johns Hill
Sevenoaks
Kent
TN13 3NX

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