OnlineGalleries.com Twitter Feed Follow OnlineGalleries.com on Facebook Follow OnlineGalleries.com on Pinterest
Select Language
Dutch
English
Finnish
French
German
Greek
Italian
Portuguese
Spanish
Swedish
Select a Language
Close
Dutch
English
Finnish
French
German
Greek
Italian
Portuguese
Spanish
Swedish
Login
hr

EMILE GALLÉ (1846-1904)

Two ceramic Emile Galle vases after an etching by Jacques Callot (1890 France)

Make an enquiry regarding this item
Slide up
Two ceramic Emile Galle vases after an etching by Jacques Callot
Two ceramic Emile Galle vases after an etching by Jacques Callot (image 2)
Two ceramic Emile Galle vases after an etching by Jacques Callot (image 3)
Slide down

Make an enquiry regarding this item
Item Signed, Inscribed, Dated Details

Emile Galle Nancy

European Dimensions

37.00 cm high

UK/USA Converted Dimensions

14.57 inches high

Current Item Condition

good

Item Description / Dealer Expertise

Two ceramic Galle vases after an etching of Spanish soldiers by Jacques Callot. Galle was very impressed and influenced by his famous fellow inhabitant of Nancy. Emile Galle studied the etchings by Callot in the museum of Lorraine in Nancy. The etchings are still in the museum. As the ceremic by Galle is very soft, most of the times there are imperfections. These two vases are no exception. They have old restorations, cramp-irons to keep the handles together and small chips on the rim. The glaze however is perfect and so are the pictures of the soldiers. A very rare pair. Signed and numbered on the bottom.

EMILE GALLÉ
Type Artist/Maker
Country of origin France
Born 1846
Died 1904

Emile Galle was born in France in 1846 and his training included art, botany, and chemistry, three subjects which he combined in his brilliant designs for glass and other mediums (pottery, furniture, jewelry). His father, Charles Galle, owned a glass and ceramics factory in Nancy. After much travelling and training, fighting in the war between France and Prussia, working for the glass company "Burgun, Schverer et Cie" in Meisenthal, Galle settled back in Nancy and set up his own glass studio in 1873 where he initially made classical forms of glass with classical, intricate, enamelled designs.
Moving on from these designs to botanical themes, again in enamelled glass, it was not until the 1878 International Exhibition in Paris, when Galle saw the work of his contemporaries such as John Northwood and Joseph Locke from England (cameo glass) and Eugene Rousseau (pate de verre) that he developed new and adventurous designs for his glass. Eleven years later at the Paris International Exhibition (1889) Galle exhibited his own new types of glass, including carved cameo work and many new colours. His achievements earned him recognition in the French Legion of Honour.
Even in those early years, Galle made two distinct qualities of glass. On the one hand his "poems in glass", masterpieces that took hours and hours of patient work to make. And on the other hand, his high quality art glass designed to be less expensive to make but still an object of beauty, good enough to carry his signature. This was later to develop into what is today called "industrial Galle".
In 1894 Galle built a massive new glassworks in Nancy, and ended his dependence on the Burgun, Schverer glassworks for producing some of his glass. He employed a team of craftsmen-designers, who worked to the edict that all Galle designs should be true to nature. Galle himself modified and approved these designs before they were made by teams of craftsmen in his Cristallerie D'Emile Galle.
Throughout the 1890's Galle won awards at international exhibitions and recognition through commissions and popular demand for his work. His techniques and style were copied by many other glassmakers who advertised their glass as "Galle style". He was a major influence on the Art Nouveau movement.
Galle died in 1904, whilst directing the work on new designs from his bed. After his death Mme Galle, his widow, continued to run the glassworks and to make Galle glass until the outbreak of war in 1914, marking all the glass sold by the works after his death with a star after the name Galle.
Emile Galle's son in law, Paul Perdrizet, re-opened the Galle glassworks after the war. With new workers and new designs, they focussed on two and three layer cameo glass with landscape and floral designs, made by acid-etching. These were popular for some years, but the company did not keep pace with the changes in style in the late twenties, and closed down in 1936.

Price

gbp 2960 (Pound Sterling)   Original: eur 3700.00 (Euro)

Choose currency:
Please note: This is a guide conversion price only. Please check with dealer which currencies are an acceptable form of payment.

More information /
Purchase this item

Please email or call + 32 3 3125190 for more information or to purchase this item.

Status

FOR SALE


Make an enquiry regarding this item

Galerie Tiny Esveld

Galerie Tiny Esveld
Frilinglei 9
Brasschaat
2930
Belgium

Contacts: Mrs Tiny Esveld
Telephone: + 32 3 3125190
Fax: +32 3 3125190
Website: www.tinyesveld.com
We are members of:
LAPADA - THE ASSOCIATION OF ART & ANTIQUES DEALERS
LAPADA - THE ASSOCIATION OF ART & ANTIQUES DEALERS
Koninklijke Vereeniging van Handelaren in Oude Kunst in Nederland (KVHOK)
Koninklijke Vereeniging van Handelaren in Oude Kunst in Nederland (KVHOK)
We deal in:

French Art Nouveau and Art Deco glass and furniture. Specialized in Emile Galle, Daum Nancy and Charles Schneider, Louis Majorelle and Louis Icart.