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Painter of figures, townscapes and landscapes in oils and watercolours; book illustrator; graphic artist; theatrical designer and member of the famous Minton Ceramics family, he attended St John's Wood School of Art between 1935-38 under P F Millard and Kenneth Martin. Between 1938-39 he travelled to France, where he shared a studio in Paris with painter and writer Michael Ayrton. At the outbreak of war, Minton registered as a conscientious objector which he later withdrew and joined the Pioneer Corps.
In collaboration with Ayrton he designed sets and costumes for John Gielgud's 1941 production of 'Macbeth'. From 1943 to 1946 Minton shared a studio with the 'two Roberts', Colquhoun and MacBryde at 77 Bedford Gardens. Also in the same building were Jankel Adler the painter, Ronald Searle the illustrator, and John Wyndham the writer; and between 1946 and 1952 he he shared a house with Keith Vaughan.
From 1943-46 Minton taught at Camberwell School of Art; 1946-48 at the Central School and from 1948 until a year before his death in 1957 at the Royal College of Art.
Minton made a number of trips overseas during the late 1940's and early 1950's, travelling to Corsica, The West Indies, Morocco and Spain, which had a strong effect on his work. He was a central figure, together with Vaughan and John Craxton, in the Neo Romantic movement of the 1940's. An outstanding draftsman, he produced a prodigious output of paintings, illustrations and drawings, and had a number of one-man shows as well as exhibiting regularly at the RA, RBA and LG, becoming a member in 1949 and an RBA in 1950. He also exhibited in New York from 1948 and his work is represented in many public collections, including the Tate Gallery.
Although outwardly an energetic and charismatic character, he was plagued by depression and melancholy, becoming increasingly more dependent on alcohol before eventually taking his own life in January 1957.

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