Leeds Pottery

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Founded in Leeds in 1770 by brothers John and Joshua Green in partnership with Richard Humble.

Success came with the production of household goods in a variety of ceramic bodies, the most popular being CREAMWARE, a type of earthenware made by several companies from white Cornish Clay with a translucent glaze, producing the pale cream colour from which it took its name.

Leeds creamware was widely exported throughout Europe. It is light in weight, and pierced decoration was a speciality. A common Leeds feature is a handle formed of two intertwined strips ending in a relief motif of flowers, leaves or berries. Most was undecorated, but some black transfer-printing and blue-printed or painted and enamelled ware exists.

Leeds pottery also produced fine-grained agate, PEARL, LUSTRE and tortoiseshell wares, some fine stoneware and small figures similar to those of Staffordshire potter Ralph wood. Few genuine products carry factory marks, but other factories copied Leeds ware, often using a Leeds mark, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.


Read more about Antique Terms (L) | Lace to Loetz and Lustre by www.antique-marks.com

Tea, which had been first brought to England in the late 17th century, became a favourite beverage of the Georgian polite society. Hugely expensive, it was kept in locked caddies and served very weak, sweetened, and with milk or cream to counter it's feared stimulant effect. The fashion for tea drinking created a demand for a whole new range of crockery, cups saucers pots and kettles, to be shown off when ladies called on one another in the late afternoon. Leeds Pottery Creamware tea services with their smooth lines, elegant twisted handles and intricate pierced decoration met this need perfectly, as they still do today.

First manufactured in the late 18th Century The Chocolate Kettle or Tea Kettle, this piece was designed with a depressed globular shape with a curved spout moulded with a female mask and foliage, large intertwined wavy rope handle with flower and leaf terminals and a large pierced baluster-knob on the lid. The bowl shaped stand on three lion mask and paw feet and provided with three shell and three foliate projections on the rim to support the kettle, the sides with panels of openwork pattern. Examples of The Chocolate Kettle or Tea Kettle can be seen in museums throughout the country, and local to the old pottery site at Temple Newsam House Leeds.

The Georgian taste for beauty and elegance meant that even the most mundane domestic articles were exquisitely crafted and decorated. The same skill and care would go into the design of ink stand for personal use as into a grand table centrepiece for public display at a dinner party, ensuring the continued appeal of pieces which long since have lost their useful purpose but still find their place as " garnitures" in the modern home.

First manufactured in the late 18th Century The Ink Stand, this piece was designed rectangular standing on a tray which has four low feet and vertical shaped sides decorated with pierced openwork. The stand has three circular apertures into which fit a sand box with a pierced top, a fountain ink stand-a ink pot with three holes for pens and a covered wafer box. The 18th century inkstand required a lidded box for sealing wafers, made from a mixture of flour and gum, and a pot for pounce (powdered pumice) used to dry the ink before the introduction of blotting paper in around 1840. Examples of The Ink Stand can be seen in museums throughout the country, and local to the old pottery site at Temple Newsam House Leeds.

Creamware pattern books published by Hartley Greens in the late 18th century contain, alongside the famous pierced wares, page upon page of every day articles for use below stairs in middle class households. Intended as purely utilitarian objects the simple lines of this range of dinner and Teawares nonetheless have an elegance of their own, revealing without the distraction of any decoration the full beauty of the cream coloured clay.
These traditional shapes are revived in the Charlotte range of cream tableware, fashioned to provide to provide elegance whilst dining for the below stairs servants.

Creamware pattern books published by Hartley Greens in the late 18th century contain, alongside the famous pierced wares, page upon page of every day articles for use below stairs in middle class households. Intended as purely utilitarian objects the simple lines of this range of dinner and Teawares nonetheless have an elegance of their own, revealing without the distraction of any decoration the full beauty of the cream coloured clay.
These traditional shapes are also revived in the Henrietta range of cream tableware, further fashioned to provide to provide even more elegance whilst dining for the below stairs servants.

Creamware pattern books published by Hartley Greens in the late 18th century contain, alongside the famous pierced wares, page upon page of every day articles for use below stairs in middle class households. Intended as purely utilitarian objects the simple lines of these jugs and bowls nonetheless have an elegance of their own, revealing without the distraction of any decoration the full beauty of the cream coloured clay.
These traditional shapes are revived in the Hunslet range of cream tableware, named after the village on the outskirts of Leeds, where the pottery stood during the years of its greatest acclaim.

The late eighteenth century saw the development of a style of tableware, which combined handsome colour, and smooth texture of plain Creamware with a moulded and often tinted edging, intended to draw the eye to the food being served. The most popular edging pattern proved to be one, which imitated the random yet rhythmic structure of a scallop shell, and Shell Edge Ware was produced in vast quantities by potteries throughout England. Inspired by original designs in Leeds Pottery's eighteenth century pattern books this new range of Shell Edge dinnerware rekindles the spirit of the Age of Elegance

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LEEDS POTTERY
Creamware Frog Mug
Cylindrical Creamware Mug containing a surprise frog. Mainly manufactured in Sunderland, this example shares characteristics with examples from the...
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LEEDS POTTERY
Leeds Creamware Teapot
A beautiful example of a Creamware Teapot from Leeds
£595
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